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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 191-195

Traditional consumption of the fruit pulp of Chrysophyllum albidum (Sapotaceae) in pregnancy may be serving as an intermittent preventive therapy against malaria infection


1 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria
2 Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Chibueze Peter Ihekwereme
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0257-7941.219363

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Background: The bark of Chrysophyllum albidum is reported to possess antimalarial property. The fruit pulp of C. albidum consumed by pregnant women of south eastern Nigeria may also possess antimalarial activity. The present preliminary study investigated the antimalarial potential of the pulp juice and seed of C. albidum. Methods: Schizonticidal activity was evaluated using the Peter's 4-day suppressive test. The prophylactic and curative antimalarial activities of the extracts were evaluated in Albino mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei. Results: The oral acute toxic dose of the pulp extract is beyond 5000 mg/kg. The seed and pulp possess both suppressive and curative properties. The seed extract suppressed early infection by 72.97% and 97.30%, at 500 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively. The pulp juice recorded 72.97% and 81.08%, at 500 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively. At 500 mg/kg dose, the level of parasite control on Day 7 was the same (96.10%) for both seed and pulp. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of antimalarial constituents in the chemically uncharacterized samples (fruit pulp and seed) of C. albidum. Its ethnomedicinal use may be valuable in pregnancy where it may possibly serve as an intermittent preventive therapy against malaria.


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